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BLOG: Danger Lurking in Backpacks

Small children lugging oversized, heavy backpacks to and from school might be risking serious injury to their growing spines and one day make them suffer from serious back pain?

Who hasn’t wondered whether small children lugging oversized, heavy backpacks to and from school might be risking serious injury to their growing spines and will one day suffer from serious back pain? 

Apparently, there is real cause for concern. 

According to a recent U.S. Consumer Product Safety Commission study, more than 75 percent of students ages 8-12 suffer from increasing back pain inflicted by carrying their schoolwork and supplies in backpacks or similar totes.

I’ve been saying since the second grade that too much homework is bad for a student! On a serious note, some of our younger elementary school students are literally carrying one-third their body weight for prolonged periods of time and distance. That puts a lot of stress on a body in the midst of development. 

And, the heavy burdens are not just affecting those students small in stature.

Student back injuries are now widespread. Ninety-six percent of the pupils monitored regularly haul much too heavy a pack on their backs. In 2001 alone, 7,000 children went to U.S. emergency rooms for backpack-related injuries. And, 60 percent of orthopedic doctors contacted regarding the study reported that they have treated children suffering from back pain caused by their heavy bags. 

The study alluded to this startling calculation:  A child carrying a 12-pound backpack, and lifting it 10 times per day for the entire school year, has carried and lifted a combined load of 21,600 pounds — the equivalent of six mid-sized cars!

Children should not carry backpacks that exceed more than 10 percent of their body weight — which translates into a 5- to 10-pound load for elementary students.   

Even with the continued progression of electronic learning – which one would think leads to fewer books – the backpack has become a survival kit for the action-packed lives that today’s children lead during and after school hours. Parents and teachers have to take an active role in limiting what we literally load onto these children. If we don’t address it now, the picture of a child carrying numerous books – which many have seen as a sign for a bright future – could foreshadow a painful outlook as well.

If you are concerned that your child may be suffering from “backpack overload,” please contact my office to have them checked. Consultation are always free of charge.

This post is contributed by a community member. The views expressed in this blog are those of the author and do not necessarily reflect those of Patch Media Corporation. Everyone is welcome to submit a post to Patch. If you'd like to post a blog, go here to get started.

GreenMom August 30, 2012 at 05:34 PM
Fiscal Conservative, I thought i had actually read on here a while back that Easton High School is going to be using IPADS..... Not sure how i feel about it. There are schools across the country that are moving to different e devices, most IPADs and apple is handing out nice discounts and im sure making a nice revenue
GreenMom August 30, 2012 at 05:40 PM
http://easton-ma.patch.com/articles/school-committee-discusses-ipad-pilot-progam
Rebecca September 05, 2012 at 03:55 PM
Another great insentive to aim for more technology in the school. Tablets, cloud computing, whiteboards..
Rebecca September 05, 2012 at 03:57 PM
A school in Foxboro incorporated ipads into their school, and results were positive. It makes sense in many ways
Francis Stevens September 06, 2012 at 08:47 PM
Hi Marc, in your article you state 'According to a recent U.S. Consumer Product Safety Commission study, more than 75 percent of students ages 8-12 suffer from increasing back pain inflicted by carrying their schoolwork and supplies in backpacks or similar totes.' I have seen a similiar study which stated 'More than 13,700 kids aged 5 to 18 were treated in hospitals and doctors' offices for backpack-related injuries in a single year' but have not been able to locate the study you refer to- could you please cite the full reference? Thanks in advance, Francis Stevens

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